Genesis Chapter 27:26-29 Blessings and a curse part 3

 

26 And his father Isaac said unto him, Come near now, and kiss me, my son. 27 And he came near, and kissed him: and he smelled the smell of his raiment, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which the LORD has blessed: 28 Therefore God give you of the dew of heaven, and the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn and wine: 29 Let people serve you, and nations bow down to you: be lord over your brethren, and let your mother’s sons bow down to you: cursed be every one that curses you, and blessed be he that blesses you.

Rebekah has covered Jacob in skins that will resemble Esau and sent him into his father’s tent in a plan to deceive him into giving Jacob what had already been determined by God to be his. She has shown a lack of faith in the actions and will of God.

Isaac had acted just as badly in determining to give Esau what was already determined to be Jacob’s by giving it in the form of the “Berakhah,” or the blessing. This is something different than the “Bekhor,” or “Double-portion” given to the first-born, or in this instance, Jacob, and resembles what we know as when someone reads out the stipulations of a will.

Isaac tries to give Esau what is promised in the double portion as his blessing.

The blessing consists of four principles that we can learn from and apply to our daily lives:

1. It involves a tender meaningful touch

26 And his father Isaac said unto him, Come near now, and kiss me, my son. 27 And he came near, and kissed him:

It implies something personal between both parties that is meant for that specific person and not a blanket blessing.

Here are some points to keep in mind regarding this principle:

We live in a parent-less society, where grand-parents are raising their grand-children.

The main reason cults can get a firm grasp on teenagers is only because their parents don’t show them enough attention at home.

Most prostitutes have an issue with their father not giving them enough attention when they were younger.

This doesn’t mean that you over-bear them with attention, it just meant that you have a part in their lives, and show them that they are important to you.

2. It involves a message of evaluation

27 And he came near, and kissed him: and he smelled the smell of his raiment, and blessed him, and said, See, the smell of my son is as the smell of a field which the LORD has blessed:

Esau was a very skilled hunter and Isaac is acknowledging this. Sometimes all our kids want from us is what we think of them; what we see as their strengths and their weaknesses. Sometimes all they want is for us to acknowledge them for who they are and what we see in them presently.

3. It involved a word about destination

28 Therefore God give you of the dew of heaven, and the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn and wine:

It has been said that in Orthodox Jewish homes, they already have their children’s specific future in mind even when they are small children. This helps develop them into what they will be as adults.

We need to also let our children and grand-children know what we see in them.

4. It involves a promise of commitment

29 Let people serve you, and nations bow down to you: be lord over your brethren, and let your mother’s sons bow down to you: cursed be every one that curses you, and blessed be he that blesses you.

This involves a commitment from Isaac as an intercessory pray of sorts that he was determined to see the Lord’s blessings continue on in his son’s life. We need to constantly be praying for our kids and be that intercessor for them as they grow into what the Lord has waiting for them.

 

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About Clint Rodgers

I am a father of 2 wonderful children and the husband of a beautiful woman who has taught me more about compassion for goofballs than I could have ever learned. I have know Jesus for many years but about 5 years ago I truly met Him and now I do my best to follow Him as I walk in this world
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